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With the Return of the Occupy Movement, Crime.org has Tips for Planning a …

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Crime.org

Social activist Mike Mann said he hopes to warn people about scams in the community with his Crime.org website.

What do you want your protest to accomplish? Do you want to raise awareness? Do you want to change a policy or law? You need to have a goal and identify your audience within that goal in order for the protest to be effective.

Dewey Beach, DE (PRWEB) May 31, 2012

Warm weather is here and the Occupy Wall Street movement is back in force. But whether organizing an Occupy demonstration or protesting for another cause, the process can feel daunting. Crime.org founder Mike Mann said spearheading a protest is easier than it sounds. He had these tips:

“If you don’t like something, the great thing about America and the First Amendment is that you can do something about it,” Mann said. “And organizing a protest is a great way to get your voice heard.”

He explained that the first step in organizing a protest is setting a goal.

“What do you want your protest to accomplish? Do you want to raise awareness? Do you want to change a policy or law? You need to have a goal and identify your audience within that goal in order for the protest to be effective,” Mann said.

The second step is determining the best forum for the protest.

“You need to determine where your protest will be held and how it will be held,” Mann said. “Will you use the Internet or take to the streets to voice your concerns? Will your protest be silent, or loud and in your face?”

Organizers must then set the date and time of the protest.

“Pick a time that will help you get in front of your target audience and accomplish your goal most effectively,” said Mann. “If you’re targeting the general public, then schedule your protest for the weekend when the public is out and about. If you’re targeting a business executive or lawmaker, schedule your protest when they are most likely to see you.”    

Make sure to verify whether a permit is required to protest in the city.

“Most of the time, you won’t need a permit on public land because it is your First Amendment right. But if you are expecting a large crowd or plan to use sound equipment, it’s always a good idea to call city hall or the local police station to make sure,” Mann said.

After picking a day and time, start preparing protest materials.

“Make signs and pamphlets that let people know what you are protesting. If your protest is online, create images and videos with embed codes,” Mann said. “Create a website you can refer people to after the event and put the Web address on all your protest materials.”

Jordan Kasteler, an online marketing strategist for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), has organized about 10 protests. He recommended making plenty of signs for those who attend.

“You shouldn’t rely on people to bring their own signs,” Kasteler said.

The most effective protest signs have big, bold letters and short messages, he said.

Meanwhile, Mann emphasized the importance of promoting protests beforehand.

“Crime.org has used postcards, press releases and social media to promote protests,” he said. “Do whatever you can to get the word out about the protest so people show up to support your cause.”

And Kasteler said stay positive during the demonstration.

“You’ll always have hecklers, so embrace them. Don’t get caught up in arguing, hate, or negativity. Other people observe your behavior, so you want to always be kind and respectful to everyone to help your message get out in the most effective way,” he said.

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